Galway Bay Of Foam And Fury 

  • Brewed by: Galway bay brewery
  • Style: Double IPA
  • ABV%: 8.5
  • From: Galway, Ireland 

So I got a lot heat yesterday when I said I wasn’t a lover of IPA. I said I could appreciate a good one and I enjoyed them but personally they wouldn’t be top of my list. It all comes down to personal preference with beer, don’t let anyone tell you what you should or shouldn’t like. If you enjoy a Belgian lambic Kriek, as I know I do from time to time, you go ahead and enjoy the hell out of that. Or if you prefer a mug of strong imperial stout warmed by dipping a hot poker straight from the fire, as my Granny was fond of, well just you do that. I’ll try and give my personal opinion on whatever lands in my glass and if that inspires you to try it out too, then great! That’s my job done. 

So anyway…

IPA or in this case Double IPA, personally I usually call it Imperial IPA, I think Double is more the American term but since they are pretty much responsible from the creation of IPAs steroid bloated brother, we’ll call it whatever they want. 

Now I’m sure you are all aware of what an IPA is by now, it’s probably the most written about beer style ever. But just incase you aren’t here’s the jist. 

IPA = Indian Pale Ale. It was created during the days when Britain ruled half the bloody world. Their soldiers in India were crying out for some decent beer. The problem was that the sea journey from Britain to India was long and beer was usually past its best before date by the time it got there. And bad beer leads to unhappy soldiers. So IPA was created, a beer packed full of hops and strong in alcohol, both of these not only helped the beer survive the crossing but actually created a beer that matured and aged so well during transportation that it was far more popular with the soldiers than with anything they could get on their return to Britain. Eventually of course a version for the home market was made. 

Now Double IPA is the result of those craft brewers on the west coast of America. They had an arms race but with hops, each trying to out do the other. The result is a beer that is much stronger than the traditional IPAs (about double strength, hence the name) and with a hoppy punch that will knock your teeth in. 

Of foam and fury. Apt name because when you pour this, it’s like a foaming, cloudy sea in the midst of a furious storm… or at least it would be if it wasn’t a beautiful golden orange colour. It has an aroma of pine, grass and citrus fruits. The taste is everything you’d expect from a good IPA. Strong bitterness from the hops but this is perfectly balanced by the complex fruity hit. There is a slight hint of malts that I really wasn’t expecting but was very pleasantly surprised by. 

This beer is almost too drinkable, the bold flavours mask the strength of it and at 8.5% you could easily over do it with this one. But if you’re patient and take the time to savour the flavours, I can think of few better ways to pass a spring afternoon than sitting outside with a glass of this. Maybe the only way it could be better was to look out over Galway bay itself. 

Cheers


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4 thoughts on “Galway Bay Of Foam And Fury 

  1. Ugh. Apologies in advance for this, but the amount of rubbish written about the birth of IPA is staggering. The tide of bullshit will never be stopped; it has too much momentum now, but I still think it should be called out when it raises its head. It’s not your fault: the story you tell is repeated on a million bar menus and is even in supposedly-reputable beer books. But, in the interest of adding just a teeny drop of truth into the vast ocean of lies:

    IPA = Indian Pale Ale.
    No, India Pale Ale.

    It was created during the days when Britain ruled half the bloody world. Their soldiers in India were crying out for some decent beer.
    The name IPA wasn’t applied until long after the India-based part of the story had ended, but the beer which eventually evolved into IPA was not intended for soldiers. It dates to the time before India became part of the British empire, when it was ruled by the East India Company, a totally private company, a bit like a modern multinational. The pale ale was consumed by the higher-ups, not the company drones.

    The problem was that the sea journey from Britain to India was long and beer was usually past its best before date by the time it got there.
    Absolutely 100% untrue. There was a very successful porter trade from England to India, before and after the rise to fame of pale ale. Pale ale became incredibly popular, yes, but not because other beer went bad.

    And bad beer leads to unhappy soldiers. So IPA was created, a beer packed full of hops
    There is no specific evidence which says the pale ale shipped to India in the 19th century contained extra hops. However, there is advice on record to brewers making beer for export that it should have extra hops. So it’s likely, but not certain, that proto-IPA was extra-hoppy.

    and strong in alcohol
    Total nonsense. There’s no evidence anywhere of proto-IPA being extra strong. The IPAs which were popular back in England during the 19th century were often among the weakest beers the breweries made. The strength myth was invented by American writers in the 1980s.

    both of these not only helped the beer survive the crossing but actually created a beer that matured and aged so well during transportation that it was far more popular with the soldiers than with anything they could get on their return to Britain. Eventually of course a version for the home market was made.
    Again, not soldiers, but this bit is true: the beer did miraculously mature, it was insanely popular with consumers (the Company execs) and when they got home they created a demand for it, which spread.

    Phew. Pete Brown’s Hops & Glory is a great book on the subject if you’re interested in more detail, explained better.

    And apologies again.

    Like

    • No apologies necessary, you’re very accurate on all your points. I’m aware of most of your corrections but my writing style is as much if not more for entertainment purposes as it is for educational purposes. I’m by no stretch an expert, just a very keen amateur. So I wouldn’t dream of trying to go up against people like Pete Brown who you mentioned, I’m actually a big fan of Pete’s work and his writings on IPA are unsurpassable.
      Thanks for taking the time to read my review and taking the time to write such a detailed reply, which I enjoyed reading. Feel free to add some fact checked notes to any of my future pieces you happen to read.
      But as the Landlord himself says “never let facts get in the way of a good story”

      Like

      • I can agree with you on that to a certain extent, though fiction is always more popular in writing than non fiction. I try to keep things light and entertaining and I right my reviews in character which I admit isn’t the norm.
        But there are thousands of beer writers out there much more knowledgeable than me, they can write whole chapters on particular varieties of hops. Which isn’t the kind of work I personally enjoy reading but many do.
        I actually had a whole section on how porter was also transported successfully at the time and a short bit about how strong the IPAs of the day were compared to other beers and modern beers but I felt it ruined the flow.
        I tend to write my pieces very quickly as a stream of conscious.
        But I don’t expect that style to appeal to all

        Like

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